clean needles, dirty drugs: harm reduction in hamiltonclean needles, dirty drugs: harm reduction in hamiltonclean needles, dirty drugs: harm reduction in hamilton

by:Cleanmo      2020-04-04
@ Media screen only and (min-width:450px){. pica-container{display:flex; align-items:flex-start}. pica-main{flex:3; order:1; padding-right:1em; border-
Right: 1px point aaa}. pica-sidebar{flex:1; order:2; padding-left:1em}. pica-container img{width:100%}}. pica-main > p:nth-child(2):first-letter {float:left; font-size:3. 1em; line-height:0. 5; margin: 0. 1em 0. 12em 0px 0px; font-weight: bold; }. pica-author-image {max-width: 100px; }aside. author-des {display: none; }
Shawn Arnold has prepared a reusable blue Ikea bag. The 47-year-
At the little street Health Clinic upstairs in Wesley Center, a public health nurse tells old jokes as he throws a box full of needles into his bag.
Arnold comes once a week to collect enough supplies for a packed house. Syringes.
Blue rubber tie belt used as stop bleeding.
Sterile water pipes.
Like him, his roommate used drugs.
But he knows that it is unlikely that they will be able to access a damage reduction project on their own.
In this way, he believes, they will be safer together.
\"It saves a lot of people using or sharing the same needles repeatedly,\" he said . \".
This is the key to reducing harm: not only to make drug users, but also to make the communities in which they live safer.
The audience followed the city\'s injury reduction team for a day this month to witness the public health needle exchange program being put into action in what experts call the national opioid crisis.
Nationwide, the number of excess deaths continues to surge.
It\'s the third in Ontario.
The main cause of accidental death is the death of an overdose every 13 hours.
Experts worry that there is too much work done by municipalities and public health agencies, all scrambling to deal with the consequences.
The continued surge of super-
A powerful pirate of Fen has created a new danger. and fear —for drug users.
Painkillers are usually prescribed in patches, 100 times stronger than morphine.
But the pirated version
In the form of powder and liquid, and in the form of mixing with other drugs --
Has appeared on the street in unpredictable power.
Of the amazing 685 opioid drugs in the province
The death associated with last year, 162 of which had a clear link to the use of fen.
In Hamilton alone, 19 people were killed last year by fen (
From 10 in 2014).
However, at a national conference in Ottawa last weekend, officials played down the risk of the new drug.
Made a plan to respond.
Including improved monitoring and prescription practices
But Michael Parkinson\'s, a member of the city drug strategy coalition
The Ontario coordinator network says it lacks the urgency and collaboration needed to be truly effective.
During the audience visit, Lisa Ingersoll was another customer at Wesley Center Clinic.
Where she added the naroone kit-an auto-
An antidote to injected opioid drugs used to combat excessive effects.
She had to use her last one for a friend who had a heroin overdose.
She shook her head and said, \"something of the new fen . \".
The drugs were tied without her knowledge.
When she tells the story of this pain, its effect on her is obvious.
When she described how the naronone injection \"killed\" her friend, her voice trembled.
Registered nurse Kathy grovroy often hears these stories from clients.
\"We spent quite a bit of time helping them with this,\" she said . \".
\"Yes, you are handing out an outfit, but they have just witnessed something very painful as well.
\"Plan to reduce damage --
Staffing and supplies included
A total of $987,786 was spent last year.
The needles and disposal alone cost $181,500.
Their cooperation with the AIDS Network has helped to cover the cost of personnel on the front line.
This is a lot of money.
But this is life. saving.
Since the launch of the project in 2014, 659 of the 176 naroone kits issued have been used to prevent overdoses.
\"These are 176 lives that would have been lost,\" said Linda Black . \"
Evans, Hamilton public health injury reduction program manager. Other benefits-like long-
Long-term medical savings
More difficult to quantify.
How many people\'s kits can prevent life-long treatment for HIV, hepatitis C, sexually transmitted infections, or other health issues?
For Ingersoll Rand, this is the second life-saving time for her nalonone kit
Although she was too nervous for the first time, she did not inject an antidote herself.
\"I was not in such a hurry for the second time,\" she said confidently . \".
It\'s daunting to think that this woman is taking the third round of naroone.
This shows how common overdoses have become.
But this is the new reality of drugs in Canada.
Ingersoll Rand admitted that it was terrible when she loaded supplies for herself.
She said she started using painkillers this spring after taking them after a car accident.
She said she wouldn\'t touch it.
\"A lot of people won\'t be close to it.
But she knows it\'s not that simple.
Any drug is a gamble today.
Lisa Warburton\'s first stop in the morning is the open space next to the old Tivoli theater north of James Street.
Community points program is a rare day --
City needle retrieval plan-
There is no specific pick-up request.
As a result, Warburton turned to a number of known drug hotspots.
Her job is to clean up any drugs.
Items discarded on the street.
On a typical day, they receive calls from local residents and businesses reporting that needles were found near or above their property.
Warburton said they would appreciate it when they showed up to collect them.
Every phone call is an emergency.
The needle will scare people.
It can be obtained by needle exchange needle and syringe: for injection drug.
Sterile water: used to dissolve the drug into a solution that can be injected.
Vitamin C package (acidifiers)
: Added to hard-soluble drugs such as brown heroin or cracks
Cocaine breaks them down into water.
Soluble drugs that can be injected.
Cooker: a clean pan on which a solid drug can be mixed with water, and the acidity agent can be broken down into an injection drug. Tourniquets(ties)
: Used to \"bundle\" and limit the flow of blood, resulting in swollen veins for easy injection.
Alcohol swab: used to clean the injection site before and after drug use.
Filter: when the drug is sucked into the syringe from the cooker, it is used to remove dense cotton balls of solid drug particles and other fragments from the solution.
Stem and mouth: Heat
Glass-resistant straw-
Like a tube for drugs.
The oral device is placed on it and helps to prevent burns in the mouth.
Screening and pushing rods: to filter out toxic chemicals, rods are used to fill the screens into the stems.
They also help prevent burns in the mouth.
Condoms and lubricants: used to prevent sexual behavior
Transmission infection
Dental Dam: used to prevent sexual behavior
Infection transmitted during oral sex.
Safety puncture kit: for preventing-home piercings.
Request stop via mobile van Program-which runs 8 p. m.
Midnight from Monday to Saturday: phone or SMS 905-317-
9966 if you want to arrange a needle or remind staff to pay attention to potential dangers, please feel free to contact the Community points program through the city: 905 546-
Health Clinic, 2489 Wesley Center Street (
2nd/F, 195 Ferguson Street. N. ):905 777-
7852 urban core community health center (71 Rebecca St. ):905-522-
3233 AIDS Network (140 King St. E):1-866-563-
When she trudged through the garbage, 0563 sure --
She found a Tivoli sitting on the concrete steps.
She picked up garbage in her gloved hand, pinched the plastic syringe together and threw it into a yellow plastic container called sharps bin. \"Could be (from)
\"Injection of cracks or pills will melt,\" she speculated . \".
\"Maybe heroin . . . . . . Prescription drugs . . . . . .
\"The Leaves began to fall, which made her hunting more tricky.
The snow is almost impossible.
She spied on a belt that might be used as a \"tie\" to look for veins.
Three or four more shots. A razor blade.
Sterile water pipes (
Used to dilute drugs).
She adds each discovery to her container one by one.
\"The use of this drug is shooting. and-go.
\"They don\'t want to be caught,\" Blake said . \"Evans.
\"On a good day you will only find one or two, but elsewhere you will find piles of things,\" Warburton said . \".
She\'s a needle Hunter.
Always scan.
\"I found myself, and even if I was walking at home with my children, my eyes were always on the ground,\" she said . \".
Last year, the public health department in Hamilton distributed about 1 million clean needles.
About 600,000 of people come back to them for disposal through their various communication programs.
Of these, 21,651 were specifically obtained through the Community points program.
In the first half of this year alone, the plan received 150 pick-up calls (
More than half of them come from the city center in Wards 2 and 3).
The city is in the early stages of studying the feasibility of bringing a safer injection site to Hamilton. The sites —
Vancouver already has
A designated and supervised injection space will be provided for drug users with the aim of preventing excessive injections and keeping the community safe.
A public survey of these sites generated 1,690 responses.
The vast majority of them (84 per cent)
Very supportive. Blake-
Evans said she was \"very happy\" and the positive response supported them in advancing the study.
After all, people are already using needles, she said.
Like Tivoli, there is already an unofficial secret injection location in the city center.
What is missing is safety.
When the James north coast looks clear, Warburton climbs back to her big white van and heads to the David brali Medical Center.
Today is stocking day.
A public health nurse is assembling dozens of naroone kits.
A large box of injection and inhalation supplies was stacked on Skids.
The fourth highlight is a group of empty laundry detergent and cat litter cans.
Floor supply room.
The staff explained that these were for those who needed a sharp container, but they were concerned that carrying such an obvious beacon of drugs would bring shame.
They also have the same opaque bag on their hands.
The most important thing here is privacy.
Around lunch time, once the supplied skids are loaded onto a white van, it can start business.
The morning Community points program shares the same van with the night needle exchange \"van\" program.
From here, the van will be shipped to the AIDS Network and The Wesley Center, where there are fixed needle exchange items several times a week.
Supplies remaining will continue
City tour tonight. It\'s 7:30 p. m.
Now, outreach staff Renee Henderson and Sharalyn Penner, a public health nurse-
Cloutier is busy planning a route in the basement of the center of Wesley.
The sex worker outreach team has just returned from their van shift and the needle change shift is about to begin.
Earlier in the day, there was a removable label on the white van so residents knew why Warburton was picking up needles on the street.
But in the evening, the mark was removed.
These customers are confidential.
Anonymous to them, and sometimes to the people around them.
To protect their privacy, the van is as harmless as possible.
People sometimes mistake them for police because of the laptop installed in the front cab of the truck.
But other than that, it\'s a humble white van.
Inside, a box of needles is piled up next to a box of ties, water and alcohol cotton swabs, \"Cookware\" and filters.
A box of condoms
Taste and routinefill the trunk. Sharps bins (
Used for handling used needles)
Sit on a bench in the back seat.
A Saturday night. from 8 p. m.
Until midnightthe van criss-
Cross the city to provide safe injection and inhalation supplies for drug addicts in Hamilton.
They stop at least 15 stops a night on average.
People call or text them for access and they do their best to plan a route and make as many connections as possible.
They have extra work to do this evening.
The night before, they got a bunch of calls and six people couldn\'t get through.
Except for the phone in their city center.
Most of their needs.
They asked to take water down, Ancaster and Dundas into account. mhayes@thespec. com 905-526-
3214 | @ mollyhayes @ media only screen and (min-width:450px){. pica-container{display:flex; align-items:flex-start}. pica-main{flex:3; order:1; padding-right:1em; border-
Right: 1px point aaa}. pica-sidebar{flex:1; order:2; padding-left:1em}. pica-container img{width:100%}}. pica-main > p:nth-child(2):first-letter {float:left; font-size:3. 1em; line-height:0. 5; margin: 0. 1em 0. 12em 0px 0px; font-weight: bold; }. pica-author-image {max-width: 100px; }aside. author-des {display: none; }
Shawn Arnold has prepared a reusable blue Ikea bag. The 47-year-
At the little street Health Clinic upstairs in Wesley Center, a public health nurse tells old jokes as he throws a box full of needles into his bag.
Arnold comes once a week to collect enough supplies for a packed house. Syringes.
Blue rubber tie belt used as stop bleeding.
Sterile water pipes.
Like him, his roommate used drugs.
But he knows that it is unlikely that they will be able to access a damage reduction project on their own.
In this way, he believes, they will be safer together.
\"You can only find one or two on a good day, but elsewhere you will find piles of things.
The 1,690 respondents said they would support the establishment of a safer injection site in Hamilton.
A Saturday night. from 8 p. m.
Until midnightthe van criss-
Cross the city to provide safe injection and inhalation supplies for drug addicts in Hamilton.
\"It saves a lot of people using or sharing the same needles repeatedly,\" he said . \".
This is the key to reducing harm: not only to make drug users, but also to make the communities in which they live safer.
The audience followed the city\'s injury reduction team for a day this month to witness the public health needle exchange program being put into action in what experts call the national opioid crisis.
Nationwide, the number of excess deaths continues to surge.
It\'s the third in Ontario.
The main cause of accidental death is the death of an overdose every 13 hours.
Experts worry that there is too much work done by municipalities and public health agencies, all scrambling to deal with the consequences.
The continued surge of super-
A powerful pirate of Fen has created a new danger. and fear —for drug users.
Painkillers are usually prescribed in patches, 100 times stronger than morphine.
But the pirated version
In the form of powder and liquid, and in the form of mixing with other drugs --
Has appeared on the street in unpredictable power.
Of the amazing 685 opioid drugs in the province
The death associated with last year, 162 of which had a clear link to the use of fen.
In Hamilton alone, 19 people were killed last year by fen (
From 10 in 2014).
However, at a national conference in Ottawa last weekend, officials played down the risk of the new drug.
Made a plan to respond.
Including improved monitoring and prescription practices
But Michael Parkinson\'s, a member of the city drug strategy coalition
The Ontario coordinator network says it lacks the urgency and collaboration needed to be truly effective.
During the audience visit, Lisa Ingersoll was another customer at Wesley Center Clinic.
Where she added the naroone kit-an auto-
An antidote to injected opioid drugs used to combat excessive effects.
She had to use her last one for a friend who had a heroin overdose.
She shook her head and said, \"something of the new fen . \".
The drugs were tied without her knowledge.
When she tells the story of this pain, its effect on her is obvious.
When she described how the naronone injection \"killed\" her friend, her voice trembled.
Registered nurse Kathy grovroy often hears these stories from clients.
\"We spent quite a bit of time helping them with this,\" she said . \".
\"Yes, you are handing out an outfit, but they have just witnessed something very painful as well.
\"Plan to reduce damage --
Staffing and supplies included
A total of $987,786 was spent last year.
The needles and disposal alone cost $181,500.
Their cooperation with the AIDS Network has helped to cover the cost of personnel on the front line.
This is a lot of money.
But this is life. saving.
Since the launch of the project in 2014, 659 of the 176 naroone kits issued have been used to prevent overdoses.
\"These are 176 lives that would have been lost,\" said Linda Black . \"
Evans, Hamilton public health injury reduction program manager. Other benefits-like long-
Long-term medical savings
More difficult to quantify.
How many people\'s kits can prevent life-long treatment for HIV, hepatitis C, sexually transmitted infections, or other health issues?
For Ingersoll Rand, this is the second life-saving time for her nalonone kit
Although she was too nervous for the first time, she did not inject an antidote herself.
\"I was not in such a hurry for the second time,\" she said confidently . \".
It\'s daunting to think that this woman is taking the third round of naroone.
This shows how common overdoses have become.
But this is the new reality of drugs in Canada.
Ingersoll Rand admitted that it was terrible when she loaded supplies for herself.
She said she started using painkillers this spring after taking them after a car accident.
She said she wouldn\'t touch it.
\"A lot of people won\'t be close to it.
But she knows it\'s not that simple.
Any drug is a gamble today.
Lisa Warburton\'s first stop in the morning is the open space next to the old Tivoli theater north of James Street.
Community points program is a rare day --
City needle retrieval plan-
There is no specific pick-up request.
As a result, Warburton turned to a number of known drug hotspots.
Her job is to clean up any drugs.
Items discarded on the street.
On a typical day, they receive calls from local residents and businesses reporting that needles were found near or above their property.
Warburton said they would appreciate it when they showed up to collect them.
Every phone call is an emergency.
The needle will scare people.
It can be obtained by needle exchange needle and syringe: for injection drug.
Sterile water: used to dissolve the drug into a solution that can be injected.
Vitamin C package (acidifiers)
: Added to hard-soluble drugs such as brown heroin or cracks
Cocaine breaks them down into water.
Soluble drugs that can be injected.
Cooker: a clean pan on which a solid drug can be mixed with water, and the acidity agent can be broken down into an injection drug. Tourniquets(ties)
: Used to \"bundle\" and limit the flow of blood, resulting in swollen veins for easy injection.
Alcohol swab: used to clean the injection site before and after drug use.
Filter: when the drug is sucked into the syringe from the cooker, it is used to remove dense cotton balls of solid drug particles and other fragments from the solution.
Stem and mouth: Heat
Glass-resistant straw-
Like a tube for drugs.
The oral device is placed on it and helps to prevent burns in the mouth.
Screening and pushing rods: to filter out toxic chemicals, rods are used to fill the screens into the stems.
They also help prevent burns in the mouth.
Condoms and lubricants: used to prevent sexual behavior
Transmission infection
Dental Dam: used to prevent sexual behavior
Infection transmitted during oral sex.
Safety puncture kit: for preventing-home piercings.
Request stop via mobile van Program-which runs 8 p. m.
Midnight from Monday to Saturday: phone or SMS 905-317-
9966 if you want to arrange a needle or remind staff to pay attention to potential dangers, please feel free to contact the Community points program through the city: 905 546-
Health Clinic, 2489 Wesley Center Street (
2nd/F, 195 Ferguson Street. N. ):905 777-
7852 urban core community health center (71 Rebecca St. ):905-522-
3233 AIDS Network (140 King St. E):1-866-563-
When she trudged through the garbage, 0563 sure --
She found a Tivoli sitting on the concrete steps.
She picked up garbage in her gloved hand, pinched the plastic syringe together and threw it into a yellow plastic container called sharps bin. \"Could be (from)
\"Injection of cracks or pills will melt,\" she speculated . \".
\"Maybe heroin . . . . . . Prescription drugs . . . . . .
\"The Leaves began to fall, which made her hunting more tricky.
The snow is almost impossible.
She spied on a belt that might be used as a \"tie\" to look for veins.
Three or four more shots. A razor blade.
Sterile water pipes (
Used to dilute drugs).
She adds each discovery to her container one by one.
\"The use of this drug is shooting. and-go.
\"They don\'t want to be caught,\" Blake said . \"Evans.
\"On a good day you will only find one or two, but elsewhere you will find piles of things,\" Warburton said . \".
She\'s a needle Hunter.
Always scan.
\"I found myself, and even if I was walking at home with my children, my eyes were always on the ground,\" she said . \".
Last year, the public health department in Hamilton distributed about 1 million clean needles.
About 600,000 of people come back to them for disposal through their various communication programs.
Of these, 21,651 were specifically obtained through the Community points program.
In the first half of this year alone, the plan received 150 pick-up calls (
More than half of them come from the city center in Wards 2 and 3).
The city is in the early stages of studying the feasibility of bringing a safer injection site to Hamilton. The sites —
Vancouver already has
A designated and supervised injection space will be provided for drug users with the aim of preventing excessive injections and keeping the community safe.
A public survey of these sites generated 1,690 responses.
The vast majority of them (84 per cent)
Very supportive. Blake-
Evans said she was \"very happy\" and the positive response supported them in advancing the study.
After all, people are already using needles, she said.
Like Tivoli, there is already an unofficial secret injection location in the city center.
What is missing is safety.
When the James north coast looks clear, Warburton climbs back to her big white van and heads to the David brali Medical Center.
Today is stocking day.
A public health nurse is assembling dozens of naroone kits.
A large box of injection and inhalation supplies was stacked on Skids.
The fourth highlight is a group of empty laundry detergent and cat litter cans.
Floor supply room.
The staff explained that these were for those who needed a sharp container, but they were concerned that carrying such an obvious beacon of drugs would bring shame.
They also have the same opaque bag on their hands.
The most important thing here is privacy.
Around lunch time, once the supplied skids are loaded onto a white van, it can start business.
The morning Community points program shares the same van with the night needle exchange \"van\" program.
From here, the van will be shipped to the AIDS Network and The Wesley Center, where there are fixed needle exchange items several times a week.
Supplies remaining will continue
City tour tonight. It\'s 7:30 p. m.
Now, outreach staff Renee Henderson and Sharalyn Penner, a public health nurse-
Cloutier is busy planning a route in the basement of the center of Wesley.
The sex worker outreach team has just returned from their van shift and the needle change shift is about to begin.
Earlier in the day, there was a removable label on the white van so residents knew why Warburton was picking up needles on the street.
But in the evening, the mark was removed.
These customers are confidential.
Anonymous to them, and sometimes to the people around them.
To protect their privacy, the van is as harmless as possible.
People sometimes mistake them for police because of the laptop installed in the front cab of the truck.
But other than that, it\'s a humble white van.
Inside, a box of needles is piled up next to a box of ties, water and alcohol cotton swabs, \"Cookware\" and filters.
A box of condoms
Taste and routinefill the trunk. Sharps bins (
Used for handling used needles)
Sit on a bench in the back seat.
A Saturday night. from 8 p. m.
Until midnightthe van criss-
Cross the city to provide safe injection and inhalation supplies for drug addicts in Hamilton.
They stop at least 15 stops a night on average.
People call or text them for access and they do their best to plan a route and make as many connections as possible.
They have extra work to do this evening.
The night before, they got a bunch of calls and six people couldn\'t get through.
Except for the phone in their city center.
Most of their needs.
They asked to take water down, Ancaster and Dundas into account. mhayes@thespec. com 905-526-
3214 | @ mollyhayes @ media only screen and (min-width:450px){. pica-container{display:flex; align-items:flex-start}. pica-main{flex:3; order:1; padding-right:1em; border-
Right: 1px point aaa}. pica-sidebar{flex:1; order:2; padding-left:1em}. pica-container img{width:100%}}. pica-main > p:nth-child(2):first-letter {float:left; font-size:3. 1em; line-height:0. 5; margin: 0. 1em 0. 12em 0px 0px; font-weight: bold; }. pica-author-image {max-width: 100px; }aside. author-des {display: none; }
Shawn Arnold has prepared a reusable blue Ikea bag. The 47-year-
At the little street Health Clinic upstairs in Wesley Center, a public health nurse tells old jokes as he throws a box full of needles into his bag.
Arnold comes once a week to collect enough supplies for a packed house. Syringes.
Blue rubber tie belt used as stop bleeding.
Sterile water pipes.
Like him, his roommate used drugs.
But he knows that it is unlikely that they will be able to access a damage reduction project on their own.
In this way, he believes, they will be safer together.
\"You can only find one or two on a good day, but elsewhere you will find piles of things.
The 1,690 respondents said they would support the establishment of a safer injection site in Hamilton.
A Saturday night. from 8 p. m.
Until midnightthe van criss-
Cross the city to provide safe injection and inhalation supplies for drug addicts in Hamilton.
\"It saves a lot of people using or sharing the same needles repeatedly,\" he said . \".
This is the key to reducing harm: not only to make drug users, but also to make the communities in which they live safer.
The audience followed the city\'s injury reduction team for a day this month to witness the public health needle exchange program being put into action in what experts call the national opioid crisis.
Nationwide, the number of excess deaths continues to surge.
It\'s the third in Ontario.
The main cause of accidental death is the death of an overdose every 13 hours.
Experts worry that there is too much work done by municipalities and public health agencies, all scrambling to deal with the consequences.
The continued surge of super-
A powerful pirate of Fen has created a new danger. and fear —for drug users.
Painkillers are usually prescribed in patches, 100 times stronger than morphine.
But the pirated version
In the form of powder and liquid, and in the form of mixing with other drugs --
Has appeared on the street in unpredictable power.
Of the amazing 685 opioid drugs in the province
The death associated with last year, 162 of which had a clear link to the use of fen.
In Hamilton alone, 19 people were killed last year by fen (
From 10 in 2014).
However, at a national conference in Ottawa last weekend, officials played down the risk of the new drug.
Made a plan to respond.
Including improved monitoring and prescription practices
But Michael Parkinson\'s, a member of the city drug strategy coalition
The Ontario coordinator network says it lacks the urgency and collaboration needed to be truly effective.
During the audience visit, Lisa Ingersoll was another customer at Wesley Center Clinic.
Where she added the naroone kit-an auto-
An antidote to injected opioid drugs used to combat excessive effects.
She had to use her last one for a friend who had a heroin overdose.
She shook her head and said, \"something of the new fen . \".
The drugs were tied without her knowledge.
When she tells the story of this pain, its effect on her is obvious.
When she described how the naronone injection \"killed\" her friend, her voice trembled.
Registered nurse Kathy grovroy often hears these stories from clients.
\"We spent quite a bit of time helping them with this,\" she said . \".
\"Yes, you are handing out an outfit, but they have just witnessed something very painful as well.
\"Plan to reduce damage --
Staffing and supplies included
A total of $987,786 was spent last year.
The needles and disposal alone cost $181,500.
Their cooperation with the AIDS Network has helped to cover the cost of personnel on the front line.
This is a lot of money.
But this is life. saving.
Since the launch of the project in 2014, 659 of the 176 naroone kits issued have been used to prevent overdoses.
\"These are 176 lives that would have been lost,\" said Linda Black . \"
Evans, Hamilton public health injury reduction program manager. Other benefits-like long-
Long-term medical savings
More difficult to quantify.
How many people\'s kits can prevent life-long treatment for HIV, hepatitis C, sexually transmitted infections, or other health issues?
For Ingersoll Rand, this is the second life-saving time for her nalonone kit
Although she was too nervous for the first time, she did not inject an antidote herself.
\"I was not in such a hurry for the second time,\" she said confidently . \".
It\'s daunting to think that this woman is taking the third round of naroone.
This shows how common overdoses have become.
But this is the new reality of drugs in Canada.
Ingersoll Rand admitted that it was terrible when she loaded supplies for herself.
She said she started using painkillers this spring after taking them after a car accident.
She said she wouldn\'t touch it.
\"A lot of people won\'t be close to it.
But she knows it\'s not that simple.
Any drug is a gamble today.
Lisa Warburton\'s first stop in the morning is the open space next to the old Tivoli theater north of James Street.
Community points program is a rare day --
City needle retrieval plan-
There is no specific pick-up request.
As a result, Warburton turned to a number of known drug hotspots.
Her job is to clean up any drugs.
Items discarded on the street.
On a typical day, they receive calls from local residents and businesses reporting that needles were found near or above their property.
Warburton said they would appreciate it when they showed up to collect them.
Every phone call is an emergency.
The needle will scare people.
It can be obtained by needle exchange needle and syringe: for injection drug.
Sterile water: used to dissolve the drug into a solution that can be injected.
Vitamin C package (acidifiers)
: Added to hard-soluble drugs such as brown heroin or cracks
Cocaine breaks them down into water.
Soluble drugs that can be injected.
Cooker: a clean pan on which a solid drug can be mixed with water, and the acidity agent can be broken down into an injection drug. Tourniquets(ties)
: Used to \"bundle\" and limit the flow of blood, resulting in swollen veins for easy injection.
Alcohol swab: used to clean the injection site before and after drug use.
Filter: when the drug is sucked into the syringe from the cooker, it is used to remove dense cotton balls of solid drug particles and other fragments from the solution.
Stem and mouth: Heat
Glass-resistant straw-
Like a tube for drugs.
The oral device is placed on it and helps to prevent burns in the mouth.
Screening and pushing rods: to filter out toxic chemicals, rods are used to fill the screens into the stems.
They also help prevent burns in the mouth.
Condoms and lubricants: used to prevent sexual behavior
Transmission infection
Dental Dam: used to prevent sexual behavior
Infection transmitted during oral sex.
Safety puncture kit: for preventing-home piercings.
Request stop via mobile van Program-which runs 8 p. m.
Midnight from Monday to Saturday: phone or SMS 905-317-
9966 if you want to arrange a needle or remind staff to pay attention to potential dangers, please feel free to contact the Community points program through the city: 905 546-
Health Clinic, 2489 Wesley Center Street (
2nd/F, 195 Ferguson Street. N. ):905 777-
7852 urban core community health center (71 Rebecca St. ):905-522-
3233 AIDS Network (140 King St. E):1-866-563-
When she trudged through the garbage, 0563 sure --
She found a Tivoli sitting on the concrete steps.
She picked up garbage in her gloved hand, pinched the plastic syringe together and threw it into a yellow plastic container called sharps bin. \"Could be (from)
\"Injection of cracks or pills will melt,\" she speculated . \".
\"Maybe heroin . . . . . . Prescription drugs . . . . . .
\"The Leaves began to fall, which made her hunting more tricky.
The snow is almost impossible.
She spied on a belt that might be used as a \"tie\" to look for veins.
Three or four more shots. A razor blade.
Sterile water pipes (
Used to dilute drugs).
She adds each discovery to her container one by one.
\"The use of this drug is shooting. and-go.
\"They don\'t want to be caught,\" Blake said . \"Evans.
\"On a good day you will only find one or two, but elsewhere you will find piles of things,\" Warburton said . \".
She\'s a needle Hunter.
Always scan.
\"I found myself, and even if I was walking at home with my children, my eyes were always on the ground,\" she said . \".
Last year, the public health department in Hamilton distributed about 1 million clean needles.
About 600,000 of people come back to them for disposal through their various communication programs.
Of these, 21,651 were specifically obtained through the Community points program.
In the first half of this year alone, the plan received 150 pick-up calls (
More than half of them come from the city center in Wards 2 and 3).
The city is in the early stages of studying the feasibility of bringing a safer injection site to Hamilton. The sites —
Vancouver already has
A designated and supervised injection space will be provided for drug users with the aim of preventing excessive injections and keeping the community safe.
A public survey of these sites generated 1,690 responses.
The vast majority of them (84 per cent)
Very supportive. Blake-
Evans said she was \"very happy\" and the positive response supported them in advancing the study.
After all, people are already using needles, she said.
Like Tivoli, there is already an unofficial secret injection location in the city center.
What is missing is safety.
When the James north coast looks clear, Warburton climbs back to her big white van and heads to the David brali Medical Center.
Today is stocking day.
A public health nurse is assembling dozens of naroone kits.
A large box of injection and inhalation supplies was stacked on Skids.
The fourth highlight is a group of empty laundry detergent and cat litter cans.
Floor supply room.
The staff explained that these were for those who needed a sharp container, but they were concerned that carrying such an obvious beacon of drugs would bring shame.
They also have the same opaque bag on their hands.
The most important thing here is privacy.
Around lunch time, once the supplied skids are loaded onto a white van, it can start business.
The morning Community points program shares the same van with the night needle exchange \"van\" program.
From here, the van will be shipped to the AIDS Network and The Wesley Center, where there are fixed needle exchange items several times a week.
Supplies remaining will continue
City tour tonight. It\'s 7:30 p. m.
Now, outreach staff Renee Henderson and Sharalyn Penner, a public health nurse-
Cloutier is busy planning a route in the basement of the center of Wesley.
The sex worker outreach team has just returned from their van shift and the needle change shift is about to begin.
Earlier in the day, there was a removable label on the white van so residents knew why Warburton was picking up needles on the street.
But in the evening, the mark was removed.
These customers are confidential.
Anonymous to them, and sometimes to the people around them.
To protect their privacy, the van is as harmless as possible.
People sometimes mistake them for police because of the laptop installed in the front cab of the truck.
But other than that, it\'s a humble white van.
Inside, a box of needles is piled up next to a box of ties, water and alcohol cotton swabs, \"Cookware\" and filters.
A box of condoms
Taste and routinefill the trunk. Sharps bins (
Used for handling used needles)
Sit on a bench in the back seat.
A Saturday night. from 8 p. m.
Until midnightthe van criss-
Cross the city to provide safe injection and inhalation supplies for drug addicts in Hamilton.
They stop at least 15 stops a night on average.
People call or text them for access and they do their best to plan a route and make as many connections as possible.
They have extra work to do this evening.
The night before, they got a bunch of calls and six people couldn\'t get through.
Except for the phone in their city center.
Most of their needs.
They asked to take water down, Ancaster and Dundas into account. mhayes@thespec. com 905-526-
Custom message
Chat Online 编辑模式下无法使用
Chat Online inputting...